Celebrate in the Light of 90 Candles-

I know many of you enjoy my morning affirmations… As I’ve explained before, these are not my worlds, although at times I adjust the wording to fit my situation better. I receive weekly emails, containing daily affirmations from Centers for Spiritual Living (CSL).  Affirmations are known as Spiritual Mind Treatment, Affirmative Prayer, Scientific Prayer or simply ‘Treatment’,, …and is the chosen method of prayer when practicing the Science of Mind, the spiritual teachings of Ernest Holmes. It is a metaphysical technique which focuses on a positive outcome, as if it already exists, rather than the sort of prayer wherein you are ASKING for something, which suggests it is in someone else’s control.
 
The Laws of the Universe are utilized with this practice. We are brought to the realization that within the universe there is one Infinite, Universal Presence that permeates everything, and therefore this Presence, being everywhere, has to be right within us.
 
This type of “church” or spirituality was founded by Ernest Holmes. In February 1927, 20 years after Ernest Holmes began his path of self-education, he founded the Institute of Religious Science and School of Philosophy. The Institute opened in rented office space on Wiltshire Boulevard, with lectures presented at the nearby Ambassador Hotel. Holmes was 40 years old.
He had, by that time, completed his seminal work, “The Science of Mind,” and his following consisted of more than just casual spectators. Many were dedicated students who actively supported his teaching and had urged him to set up a more formal organization.
 
Initially, Holmes resisted this step, believing that an organization would be restrictive. He insisted on the necessity of individual spiritual freedom, saying that Infinite Truth was not the exclusive property of any special group and that his teaching was not a “final revelation.” His followers convinced him that the organizational structure would further support his work in ways they couldn’t.
 
He made clear that Religious Science should not be considered a cure-all religion, nor should its message be seen as infallible. “Religious Science is shorn of dogmatism,” he said, “freed from superstition, and open at the top for greater illumination, unbound and free.”
A few months later, he began publishing Science of Mind magazine to inform readers about “the subtle powers of mind and spirit, and to show such powers may be consciously used for the betterment of the individual and the race.”

In February 1927, 20 years after Ernest Holmes began his path of self-education, he founded the Institute of Religious Science and School of Philosophy. The Institute opened in rented office space on Wilshire Boulevard, with lectures presented at the nearby Ambassador Hotel. Holmes was 40 years old.

He had, by the time, completed his seminal work, “The Science of Mind,” and his following consisted of more than just casual spectators. Many were dedicated students who actively supported his teaching and had urged him to set up a more formal organization.

Initially, Holmes resisted this step, believing that an organization would be restrictive. He insisted on the necessity of individual spiritual freedom, saying that Infinite Truth was not the exclusive property of any special group and that his teaching was not a “final revelation.” His followers convinced him that the organizational structure would further support his work in ways they couldn’t.

He made clear that Religious Science should not be considered a cure-all religion, nor should its message be seen as infallible. “Religious Science is shorn of dogmatism,” he said, “freed from superstition, and open at the top for greater illumination, unbound and free.”

A few months later, he began publishing Science of Mind magazine to inform readers about “the subtle powers of mind and spirit, and to show such powers may be consciously used for the betterment of the individual and the race.”

This month, please join us in celebrate]ing in the light of 90 candles to honor these invaluable teachings.